Best Website Making Software For Mac

Posted By admin On 16.02.22

Building a Website Has Never Been Easier

RapidWeaver for Mac is a powerful and easy to use web design app that puts you back in control. Build your own beautiful, responsive, websites without having to write a line of code. Build your own beautiful, responsive, websites without having to write a line of code.

Getting your message out these days requires good helpings of Facebook and Twitter, with maybe a dash of Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Tumblr. But that's not enough: if you want an internet presence that truly represents you or your organization, you also need a website that sets you apart from the crowd. A real website, as opposed to a social media page, gives you complete control over design and content. This lends credibility to your business, organization, or personal brand. Facebook pages all look alike in terms of design, but on your own website, you can realize a brand image, offer products for sale, and integrate third-party web services.

It's never been easier to set up a professional-looking, design-forward website. Well-known DIY site building services such as Squarespace and Wix are constantly improving and adding new capabilities. Newer competitors, such as Simvoly, Strikingly, Ucraft, and uKit, are popping up all the time with their own clever twists on the process.

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  2. RapidWeaver for Mac is a powerful and easy to use web design app that puts you back in control. Build your own beautiful, responsive, websites without having to write a line of code. Build your own beautiful, responsive, websites without having to write a line of code.
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You Need a Website

First, let's discuss why you even need a webpage in this day of social media domination of the web. On a personal level, you wouldn't want to send prospective employers to your Facebook page, so a personal website makes more sense as an online, customized resume. Another reason worth considering, for both personal and business purposes, is that building your own site gives you endless design choices. You have total control over products and services you may sell and how they're delivered, too.

Further, having a real, dedicated site makes a business seem more authoritative and trustworthy than a Facebook or Tumblr presence can on its own (though you should certainly also consider those services as elements of your online presence). It's as much an opening ante in the business world as having a business card for your company.

Getting your own website used to require a lot of tech wizardry, including knowledge of servers, HTML, FTP, site registrars, and web hosting services. Thankfully, we now live in the age of easy online site builders. The services included here let you make a well-designed, mobile-friendly site with minimal technical knowledge. They can even take a small or sole-proprietor business to profitability with buy links, online stores, and other money-making options.

Best Website Making Software For Mac

Larger businesses spend many thousands of dollars to get their custom-designed and programmed sites, but there's no need for smaller organizations and individuals to go to that kind of expense. For about $10 per month (or around $25 if you're selling products) and a few hours of your time, the services included here can help you create a unique, attractive website.

With all these services, you build everything yourself, starting with a template you choose from a (hopefully) wide, well-categorized selection. Most use simple drag-and-drop interfaces that let you include items such as social share buttons, photo galleries, blogs, and media players. Some even let you restrict viewing with a password and let you have people join up as members of your site (see the table).

Free Website Builders

Several of the services included here offer free options, too. If you choose that path, however, your site will include branding from the provider, which necessarily makes your site less impressive to savvy surfers—and shoppers. Free offerings vary greatly in the storage, bandwidth, and site options they allow, so read the small print to find out how much you get with each provider. Strikingly, Weebly, Wix, and WordPress.com are among the most generous with their free offerings, if that's the way you want to go.

Register Your Domain

Before you can start building your home on the web, you need an address for it. Most of the site builders here can register a unique domain for you, and all can give you a web address using the provider's domain, for example, yourname.sitebuilder.com. Some include a custom domain name with their plans, usually requiring a year's commitment. The services also let you use a domain you've acquired from a third-party registrar such as pairNIC, but you often must pay the site builder for that privilege.

Website Design Tools

All of the web services listed here have you start by choosing from a selection of templates for your site. The better ones, such as Duda, Gator, Squarespace, and Wix, use templates that automatically reformat your site for viewing on mobile devices. They also offer specifically targeted templates based on your site's purpose, such as for promoting a bakery's sales, getting gigs for a musician, or keeping wedding guests informed.

Once you've chosen a template for your site, you need to make it your own. Most site builders let you tweak the color scheme, fonts, and page layouts, as well as add new pages. A good site builder offers sub-templates for the most commonly used page types: About, Contact, Products, Galleries, FAQ, Blog, and so on.

Of course, you'll also want to add custom content to those pages. You do this by adding text areas, photos (see Photos and Galleries section below), buttons, and other widgets. The better site builders, such as Wix and Duda, offer a marketplace of third-party widgets, for things like forms, chat, reservations, and social feeds.

Some site builders, such as Squarespace, Strikingly, Virb, and uKit, restrict you to placing page objects in spots that won't make your site look garish, which can be an advantage if design isn't your forte. Other builders offer more freedom; if that's what you're looking for, check out Gator or Wix. Gator in particular strikes a good balance between design freedom and reponsive restrictions.

Instant Sites

Starting with Wix's ADI (artificial design intelligence) tool, some of the site builders now offer a tool that lets you enter social accounts and other personal or business info, and presto bingo, they get you a no-work website. Jimdo and Simvoly now offer similar if somewhat less ambitious tools. Wix's ADI even impressed a professional designer acquaintance of ours with results we saw in testing, mostly using images and information it scraped from her LinkedIn account.

Mobile Site Design

Any site builder that wants to call itself modern these days must be capable of producing sites that play well on mobile, and all of those listed here can do so to some extent. Some, such as Squarespace and Weebly, use strictly responsive-design approaches to create a mobile site from what you've built for the web.

Responsive design is a popular web design strategy used by some of these site builders. This approach reformats the same webpage content to fit different screens. But in terms of SEO (search engine optimization), the search engines only care about whether a site displays suitably on mobile screen sizes. Both Bing and Google have pages where you can enter your URL to see if your site plays on mobile acceptably.

Website Building Software For Mac

The strict responsive approach of Simvoly, uKit, and Weeby means you get no control over the mobile-only view. Gator, Ucraft, and Wix, by contrast, offer a mobile site preview and let you make customizations that only apply to mobile viewing. For example, you may want a splash page to welcome mobile viewers, or you may want to leave out an element that doesn't work well on the smaller screens.

Photos and Galleries

Let's face it, one of the things we like best about the web is looking at pictures. The site builders here all offer some degree of photo and gallery display. Some, like Gator, Squarespace, and Wix, also offer loads of stock photography for you to use. Some let you touch up images with editing tools such as cropping, brightness, and in some cases even Instagram-like filters. Others, such as Gator, Simvoly, Ucraft, and uKit offer no photo editing at all, aside from resizing and positioning.

Photo gallery options also vary widely. For example, Weebly offers a good selection of styles for your online galleries, while others like Duda and GoDaddy are more limited in visual options.

Making Money From Your Website

Of course, if you want to go all out for sales, you need to move up to a dedicated web shopping cart service like Shopify, but that's a step you might not be ready to take. Most of the services here offer some ability to sell items from your site, if only in the form of a PayPal button, but some don't offer that in free accounts.

More-advanced options found in some builders let you process credit card payments and add your own cart and checkout pages. The more-powerful site builders include product promotions, email marketing, and inventory and shipping tools. Some let you sell digital downloads, while others don't; see the table above to find out which do. Only a couple of these builders let you put ads on your site, though most of them allow some degree of custom HTML code insertion.

Social and Site Stats

All of the site builders included here let you put Facebook Like and Twitter Follow buttons on your pages, and some even let you display feeds from the social networks. Some give you help building a Facebook Page and tying it into your site design and updates. Many products offer some sort of SEO tool, but too often this is just a form on which you can enter meta tags. You're mostly left to wrestle with that black magic known as SEO for yourself. It's very important to submit and verify your site to the search engines, unless you don't want anyone to find it!

Most of the products here can tell you about your site traffic, though the amount of detail varies greatly among them, and it's often tied to premium account levels. For example, Weebly can not only show you page views and unique visitors for each day of the month, but also search terms used to get to the site, referring sites, and top-visited pages. Wix and uKit, at the other end, have nothing in the way of built-in site stats, instead requiring you to create your own Google Analytics account, and even that requires a paid account. Another drawback of that approach is that you can only see traffic from the preceding day and earlier; it's not up-to-the-minute, or even the hour.

The WordPress Question

WordPress is a big name when it comes to creating websites. But you should know that WordPress.com is not what most people are talking about when they mention WordPress. What most internet-savvy people mean by the term WordPress is the free, open-source blogging platform that comes from WordPress.org. Using this requires you to find your own website hosting service. The WordPress.org software is such a popular site-building platform that many web hosting services even offer managed WordPress hosting plans. WordPress.com, on the other hand, is a service that deploys and hosts that software for you, so you don't have to go out and find your own hosting service.

WordPress (either version) is a blog-focused content management system that accepts plug-ins and themes that extend its capabilities to what most of what the other products here offer, including commerce. In fact, WordPress.com uses plug-ins such as JetPack to provide many of its features. As a whole, WordPress (either .com or .org) is not as easy to use as the other options in this roundup, but if blogging and site transferability are of key importance and you don't mind digging into its weeds a bit, you should consider the platform—especially WordPress.org. Furthermore, the ability to use WordPress is a valuable skill, as some estimates say that WordPress powers 30 percent of the internet.

Note that we reviewed WordPress.com as a website builder, but its rating of three stars doesn't quite qualify it for inclusion in this roundup.

Moving to Another Site Builder

One downside of most of these services is that, should you someday want to move to another web host, you'll likely be out of luck because of the custom code they use to display your site. Only a few of the services here let you take your site to another web hosting service: The most complete example of this is Weebly, which lets you download the standard site server folders. Squarespace offers some transferability by letting you output your site in standard WordPress format. As you might expect, the same transferability holds for WordPress.com.

Website Building Support Options

Support among the services varies widely, from free WordPress.com account's only offering community support, to Jimdo's email-only service, to Wix's telephone-callback service—even for free accounts! Many of the site builders offer rich online support knowledge bases and FAQs, so there's a good chance you won't even need to contact the company. I test each service's support as part of the review process by asking about some less-common site-building procedures.

So Many Site Building Choices!

Best Web Design Software Mac

As you can see, there are quite a few factors to consider when choosing an easy online website builder. And you have a slew of provider choices—there are at least 20 more vendors than those included in this list. Hardly a week goes by when we don't get a pitch from a new one we've never heard of before. We've reviewed many of those, but they didn't make the cut, either because of outdated site designs, lack of site-building options, or inadequate ease-of-use. Some recent examples include 1&1 Ionos MyWebsite, PageCloud,Ucraft, and Yahoo Small Business Websites.

The selection below should be plenty to get you started. Read the blurbs and then click through to the linked reviews to find the one that best suits your needs. And don't hesitate to chime in below in the comments section to report your experience with a site builder or praise one that's not included. For more advice and alternatives to DIY website building, check out our primer, How to Create a Website.

Best Website Builders Featured in This Roundup:

  • Wix Review


    MSRP: $4.08

    Pros: Extremely intuitive site-building interface. Loads of site gadgets. Free site option. Hundreds of templates for specific businesses and other uses. Good mobile-site-building tools. Rich web-store features. Excellent Support.

    Cons: No built-in statistics feature. Sites don't use responsive design in the strict sense.

    Bottom Line: Wix is the easiest and fullest-featured website builder around, and you can use it to create your own highly customized site for free.

    Read Review
  • Duda Review


    MSRP: $14.25

    Pros: Clear interface. Strong mobile site building. Free site option. Social media integration. Powerful site-traffic analysis. Capable web store tools. Even free accounts can sell products online.

    Cons: No third-party widget store. No email newsletter integration. No ability to port site to another host.

    Bottom Line: Duda offers everything you need to easily build and host a rich, mobile-friendly, full-featured website, complete with commerce.

    Read Review
  • Gator Website Builder Review


    MSRP: $4.99

    Pros: Well-designed, clear interface. Attractive, modern site templates. Yearly plans include domain name and SSL certificate. Easy store setup with digital download selling. Good included site stats.

    Cons: No free plan. Lacks email marketing. No photo editing. Cannot schedule blog posts. Limited app store.

    Bottom Line: Gator, a new offering in the DIY website building space from established name HostGator, hits all the right notes and it won't break the bank.

    Read Review
  • Squarespace Review


    MSRP: $12.00

    Pros: Beautiful, responsive designs that accommodate mobile screens. Deep selling capabilities, including digital downloads. Free SSL certificate. Good help and analytics tools.

    Cons: Less straightforward than competing site builders. Fewer and more restrictive templates than the competition. No free level. Lacks third-party widget marketplace. Little customization for mobile sites.

    Bottom Line: Squarespace lets you build a modern, beautiful, responsive website for desktop and mobile viewing, and it also offers the potential for full-scale commerce.

    Read Review
  • GoDaddy GoCentral Review


    MSRP: $5.99

    Pros: Generous storage and bandwidth. Easy, clear interface. Good-looking sites for both desktop and mobile viewing.

    Cons: Limited layout and design customization. No photo editing. No built-in traffic reporting. Online store requires upgrade.

    Bottom Line: GoDaddy's new website builder is easy to use and delivers good-looking responsive-design sites, but it doesn't allow lots of tinkering with page design.

    Read Review
  • Weebly Review


    MSRP: $8.00

    Pros: Intuitive interface. Attractive responsive-design themes. Full commerce options. Site stats included. Lets you download your site code as standard HTML/CSS. iPad site-editing app.

    Cons: Lacks reusable photo storage. Mobile sites not customizable. No interface-wide undo feature.

    Bottom Line: Weebly is an easy-to-use site builder with a free option. It lets you create and publish attractive, responsive-design sites, blogs, and online stores.

    Read Review
  • Strikingly Review


    MSRP: $8.00

    Pros: Makes site-building simple. Preview full sample sites built in template. Good looking responsive designs for mobile and desktop.

    Cons: Fewer template choices and less customization than some competitors. Many standard features require premium paid account.

    Bottom Line: Strikingly lets you create a well-designed site with extreme ease, but it offers limited options for customization.

    Read Review
  • uCoz uKit Review


    MSRP: $4.00

    Pros: Slick interface. Saves uploaded images for reuse. Good, easy blogging tool. Gamification features. Low monthly price.

    Cons: Restrictive site element positioning. Lacks mobile site customization. Zero image editing. No included site statistics.

    Bottom Line: This good-looking website builder from Russia offers most everything you could want to get a mobile-friendly, commerce-capable site online. Look elsewhere for built-in statistics and image editing, however.

    Read Review
  • Simvoly Review


    MSRP: $5.00

    Pros: Clear, friendly drag-and-drop interface. Attractive, customizable, responsive-design site templates. Store functionality with digital download sales. Site stats included on dashboard.

    Cons: No photo editing tools. Cannot customize mobile sites. Lacks widget marketplace. No shipping service integrations.

    Bottom Line: Website builder Simvoly offers easy-to-use tools for creating good-looking, responsive-design sites with a respectable level of customizability.

    Read Review
  • PageCloud Review


    MSRP: $20.00

    Pros: True drag-and-drop, WYWIWYG interface. Freedom in placement and sizing of site elements. Good mobile customization. Scheduled posting.

    Cons: Expensive. Sparse e-commerce tools. No image editing. No included stats or analytics. Blog tool lacks many standard options.

    Bottom Line: PageCloud is a website builder with a modern drag-and-drop, WYSIWYG interface that gives you lots of leeway in page design and solid mobile customization, but it lacks standard e-commerce, blogging, and analytics features.

    Read Review

Anyone with a text editor, a good grasp of HTML and CSS, and enough time on their hands can create a beautiful website. But what if you don't have time to brush up on your coding skills? What if squinting at a page full of code makes your head hurt? Or what if you're, you know, lazy?

A bumper crop of Mac apps has sprung up to help people in just such a predicament, applying a friendly front end and familiar tools to the ever-more-complicated word of web coding. While none of the three polished apps we review here will be perfect for everyone, chances are that one of them has the right feature set to fit your needs.

TurboWeb

Though it's by far the least expensive option in this roundup — roughly $60 cheaper than its two rivals! — TurboWeb packs an impressive amount of power for its low price. It offers a freeform, drag-and-drop interface for placing text, images, and more. I particularly liked the customizable grid and guides that let you impose some order on what might otherwise be chaos. Each element you place on the page snaps automatically to the nearest guide, or into alignment with neighboring elements.

Unique among this lineup, TurboWeb boasts a huge, searchable library of royalty-free stock photos — a big help for zero-budget designers who want to spice up an otherwise text-heavy site. I also enjoyed TurboWeb's instant access to my personal Pictures folder and iPhoto or Photos library. That said, you can't search through those libraries from within TurboWeb, so if you've got a pile of pictures on your hard drive, be prepared to do a lot of scrolling until you find the one you want. I also found it odd that I couldn't use any of the program's stock photos in its photo-carousel widget.

On the whole, TurboWeb does most of what you'd want it to perfectly adequately, including a bare-bones but functional way to upload your site to the FTP server of your choice (or sign up for TurboWeb's own recommended hosting provider). The online help files are simple but sufficient as well.

Nonetheless, TurboWeb fell short in a few key areas. I couldn't get text to wrap around an image for the life of me. I couldn't create a button with different active, hover, or default states. TurboWeb's short list of font options can't be changed or expanded. Responsive design support — allowing you to display the same pages differently on devices with different-sized screens — was rudimentary at best; you can swap between desktop and tablet versions, but if you've finished creating one layout, you'll have to start all over from a blank page to create the other. And TurboWeb's ability to edit and apply custom classes is rudimentary at best. It applies only to text — not images, buttons, or anything else — and offers no control over margins or padding.

  • $19.99 - Download now

EverWeb

Like TurboWeb, EverWeb offers a similar drag-and-drop interface (albeit without the handy grid or guides) and overall feature set, with the same limitations when it comes to customizing CSS style elements on your pages. And it shares TurboWeb's somewhat clunky approach to 'responsive design,' requiring you to create a whole separate set of mobile counterpart pages to those on your desktop site. It lacks TurboWeb's sizable stock image library, but makes up for it by automatically supporting any of Google's extensive library of free fonts, once you've downloaded and installed them on your Mac. So why should you even consider shelling out $60 more than TurboWeb for EverWeb?

First, EverWeb boasts outstanding help files, including an extensive and well-written manual running more than 100 pages, along with handy video tutorials available right from the app's opening screen.

Second, EverWeb's publishing tools are somewhat more robust, with more options for FTP server info, and the ability to add custom header/footer code and even a favicon for your site.

And finally — and perhaps most importantly, if you need it — EverWeb builds in the ability to set up a basic online store, including buy buttons and a shopping cart, using PayPal. Few other web design apps offer anything like this — neither TurboWeb nor Blocs do — and those that do often charge extra for the privilege.

With the few exceptions I've noted, like TurboWeb's searchable stock photo database, EverWeb does basically everything that TurboWeb does, but just a little bit better. However, unless you want to set up your own online store quickly, easily, and inexpensively, EverWeb may not be better enough to merit paying four times TurboWeb's price.

  • Free, $79.99 after trial - Download now

Blocs

Packed with powerful but friendly features, and getting better all the time, Blocs is the app I wish I'd had back when I built sites for a living.

Rather than making you build a site from scratch, Blocs offers prebuilt page elements that you can quickly stack atop each other. Once you've roughed out the overall look of your page, it's easy to customize its content and fine-tune its appearance. Switching into 'drop mode' brings up a searchable palette of individual elements — buttons, headers, etc. — that you can place within the prebuilt frameworks to further tweak them to your liking.

Blocs boasts powerful control over CSS styles, including the ability to create custom classes and apply them to any element in your site. Tweak the custom class once — change the color from maroon to gold, for instance — and the change ripples through every element with that class, site-wide. And Blocs offers pinpoint precision over nearly every CSS style parameter you can think of, all in a clean, coherent interface.

Blocs' support for responsive design also leaves competitors eating its dust. Design a page for the desktop, and with one click you can see what it'll look like on tablets or phones, too. You can change elements of the design to improve its readability in one view without affecting how it'll look in the others. And you can even change or create custom classes specifically for phone or tablet pages as well. It's only fair to note that the sized-down versions of these pages don't always render on the actual devices exactly as they look in Blocs, but they tend to be close enough to fix with a little extra tweaking.

Blocs also supports a few fancy bells and whistles such as video backgrounds. Adding Google web fonts to Blocs' menu is as easy as pasting in the right URL. And it's the only program in this lineup to include support for several popular free or paid content management systems, including October and Pulse. Blocs's excellent help files and video tutorials can show you how to quickly set up a Blocs page as a front end for database-driven content in these systems, among many other useful tips and tricks.

Blocs isn't perfect. It's the work of a single programmer, so you'll find a few hiccups, twitches, and glitches here and there. Its prebuilt components mean you won't be able to indulge your wildest flights of design fancy. And the earnest 'helpful hint' blurbs that pop up whenever you try something new in the program quickly start to feel a little too much like Microsoft's notorious Clippy. But on the whole, it's my favorite app in this roundup by far.

  • Free, $79.99 and up for licenses - Download now!

Which app is best?

If you just want an inexpensive way to build nice-looking, no-frills sites, TurboWeb's a solid bet. If you need to set up an online store without paying through the nose, consider EverWeb. But if you want to get the most bang for your buck, you can't beat Blocs.

If we've overlooked one of your favorite apps for web design — or if you just want to gripe about how text editors are the only way to build sites — please let us know in the comments below.

Best Website Design Software For Mac

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