Best Gpu For 2010 Mac Pro

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According to Apple, once a Metal-capable graphics card has been installed in a 2010 or 2012 Mac Pro, macOS Mojave can be downloaded and installed after turning off FileVault.

Hi. I know this is the Mac OS X section but this seems like the best place on this forum for a question about a Mac's hardware. For the last several months, I've noticed that my MacBook Pro 6,2's fans are cranking up when the computer is plugged in. More recently (it may have been happening for longer), I've noticed that it doesn't even go to sleep when plugged in to the wall, even if charging is done. The white light comes on/pulsates but the fans keep running and I think I heard the hard drive working. About a month ago, I found a thread on the official Apple forum: https://discussions.apple.com/message/17456703#17456703 about resetting the SMC and typing a command in the Terminal. I tried the Terminal command while the laptop was plugged in and it returned a '1' next to 'PreventSystemSleep', so I just moved on and planned to take it to the Genius Bar when I got a chance. I wish I would have taken it in sooner, because yesterday, I turned it on to back it up (which I didn't do) for its appointment today, and I guess I left it in sleep and forgot to turn it off last time I used it, since it came up with the bars going across the grayed out screen. The bars froze, and so I did a hard shutdown. I don't know if the freezing there was a result of its likely problems I'm about to mention, but possibly. I started it up again, with the power cord connected, of course, and it seemed ok, and it said 0% battery, as I expected, at the login screen. But, it said 'Not Charging' (I've seen it before occasionally, but it's gone away-not permanent like this) once I got to the desktop and the MagSafe light was still green, not orange. I turned it off and back on, and it had the same problem. It seemed to run fine though, with the power cord plugged in.
Today I took it to the Genius Bar, and the Genius ran the diagnostic test from the ethernet cable. It showed that the battery had too low of an amperage, but he said that it wasn't the battery's fault, and it showed that only one video adapter was detected. Everything else was reported to be ok, even the logic board. However, the technician said that it would need to be replaced, which I think was because it's soldered to the discrete video card. This laptop has an integrated GPU (Intel HD Graphics) and a discrete card as well. It showed the discrete card in the diagnostic utility, and the technician wasn't sure if that was the faulty one or the one that was detected. The technician thought that the discrete card was faulty, which makes sense because I don't think the IGP would be likely to fry unless the CPU did too, which it didn't. He said that the logic board was causing the battery to not charge.
The technician at the Genius Bar was very friendly and knowledgeable but I'm wondering if there's anything else I can do to try to fix this laptop. Like I said, it works fine when plugged in, and I haven't seen any proof of the video card being faulty other than in the diagnostic test today, but I don't want to have to pay $600 to replace the logic board and video card and I really don't want to give up on the computer altogether, or deal with it as it is.
Please tell me if there's anything else I can try to fix this. I might be willing to try to fix it myself if you think I can and should solder a replacement video card to the motherboard, but obviously that would be very risky. It's out of warranty. Also, please tell me what you think caused this to happen, if you have an idea. This laptop reported temperatures of I think 90 degrees C and 80 degrees C while playing games sometimes. This certainly didn't help.
Thanks! Sorry for the long post.
Specs:
Apple MacBook Pro 6,2 (Mid 2010 15' with 2.8 GHz Intel Core i7, 4GB RAM and Nvidia GeForce GT 330M)
Mac OS X 10.7.5 (Lion)

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What are the default graphics cards provided with each Mac Pro? What Mac Pro compatible video cards are available for purchase later? What is the best video card for the Mac Pro? Which video cards have which ports?

All silver tower Mac Pro models have removable video cards with dedicated graphics and can support additional video cards, too.


Photo Credit: Apple, Inc. (Mac Pro)

Best Gpu For 2010 Mac Pro

Identification Help

If you're not certain which Mac Pro you have, all Mac Pro lines can be identified 'closely enough' by the Model Identifier in software to determine the default video card as well as confirm compatibility with aftermarket video cards.

To locate the model identifier, select 'About This Mac' under the Apple Menu on your computer and click the 'More Info...' button. If the Mac Pro is running OS X 'Lion' (10.7) or later, click the 'System Report' button after clicking 'More Info...' as well.

Externally, the Mac Pro lines can be uniquely identified by EMC Number. The EMC number is listed on the rear of the system in small type.

Useful identifiers for the Mac Pro lines include:

Mac Pro Subfamily

Model Number

Model ID

EMC Number

Original (2006)

Original (2007)

Early 2008

Early 2009

Mid-2010

Mid-2012

More details about specific identifiers are provided in EveryMac.com's extensive Mac Identification section.

EveryMac.com's Ultimate Mac Lookup feature -- as well as the EveryMac app -- also can identify these systems by their Serial Numbers.

Best Gpu For 2010 Mac Pro

Default Mac Pro Video Cards

Information on the default graphics cards -- as well as original options available via custom configuration -- are provided on the EveryMac.com specs pages for each Mac Pro model.


Photo Credit: NVIDIA, Left - GeForce 7300 GT & ATI, Right - Radeon HD 2600 XT

However, default Mac Pro video cards for each series, as well as the ports provided by each video card, also are provided below for your convenience:

Mac Pro Subfamily

Default Video Card

VRAM

Ports

Original

NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GT

256 MB GDDR2

1 SL DVI
1 DL DVI

Early 2008

ATI Radeon HD 2600 XT

256 MB GDDR3

2 DL DVI

Early 2009

NVIDIA GeForce GT 120

512 MB GDDR3

1 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Mid-2010

ATI Radeon HD 5770

1 GB GDDR5

2 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Mid-2012

ATI Radeon HD 5770

1 GB GDDR5

2 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Custom Configuration Mac Pro Video Card Options

At the time of purchase, each Mac Pro could be configured with at least one higher performance video card as an optional upgrade.


Photo Credit: ATI, Left - Radeon X1900 XT & NVIDIA, Right - GeForce 8800 GT

The video cards available via custom configuration for each Mac Pro line include:

Mac Pro Subfamily

Video Card Options

VRAM

Ports

Original

ATI Radeon X1900 XT

512 MB GDDR3

2 DL DVI

NVIDIA Quadro FX 4500

512 MB GDDR3

2 DL DVI
Stereo 3D

Early 2008

NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT

512 MB GDDR3

2 DL DVI

NVIDIA Quadro FX 5600

1.5 GB GDDR3

2 DL DVI
Stereo 3D

Early 2009

ATI Radeon HD 4870

512 MB GDDR5

1 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Mid-2010

ATI Radeon HD 5870

1 GB GDDR5

2 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Mid-2012

ATI Radeon HD 5870

1 GB GDDR5

2 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

Aftermarket Mac Pro Video Card Options

Of course, it always is possible to purchase one of the higher performance video cards that was offered with a particular Mac Pro after the initial system purchase. For the original Mac Pro models, this is your only readily available option without hacking the system by also installing a newer, officially unsupported, version of OS X.


Photo Credit: EVGA, Left - GeForce GTX 680 & AMD/Sapphire, Right - Radeon HD 7950

However, for subsequently released Mac Pro models there also are compatible aftermarket video cards available, including the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X with 12 GB of GGDR5 VRAM, the most powerful video card available for these Mac Pro models.

These all are intended to work with the Mac Pro either with default OS X support or with provided drivers:

Video Card

VRAM

Ports

OS X

1.5 GB GDDR5

2 DL DVI

10.5.7+

2 GB GDDR5

1 DL DVI
1 DP

10.6.5+

AMD Sapphire Radeon HD 7950*

3 GB GDDR5

1 HDMI
2 Mini DP
1 DL DVI

10.7.5+

2 GB GDDR5

1 HDMI
1 DP
1 DVI-I
1 DVI-D

10.8.3+

4 GB GDDR5

2 DVI
2 DP

10.8.3+

6 GB GDDR5

1 DL DVI
1 HDMI
1 DP

10.9.5+

6 GB GDDR5

1 DL DVI
1 HDMI
1 DP

10.9.5+

12 GB GDDR5

1 DVI
1 HDMI
1 Triple DP

10.10.5+

* Please note that the Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 only is compatible with the 'Mid-2010' and 'Mid-2012' Mac Pro models. The other video cards above are compatible with the 'Early 2008' and 'Early 2009' as well as the 'Mid-2010' and 'Mid-2012' Mac Pro models.

The excellent BareFeats has various 'shootouts' that compares several of the above video cards with one another as well as stock Mac Pro video cards that are well worth reviewing.

ArsTechnica, Architosh, MacsOnly, and others also offer in-depth reviews of the NVIDIA Quadro FX 4800, NVIDIA Quadro 4000, AMD Sapphire Radeon HD 7950, EVGA GeForce GTX 680, PNY NVIDIA Quadro K5000, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780, and NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X that may be of interest, too.

Site sponsor Other World Computing sells a selection of Mac Pro compatible video cards including default options, video cards that originally were offered as custom configurations, and some aftermarket options listed above.

Upgraded the video card in your Mac Pro? Please share your experiences. Thank you.

Also see: How many PCI slots of what type are provided by the Mac Pro models? How do you install a PCIe card in the Mac Pro?


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